Tag Archives: suicide

Comparing PTSD and Somatization Disorder


Comparing PTSD and Somatization Disorder shows that there are some similarities in the symptoms but for the most part they are different.  Somatization Disorder has a lot more physical symptoms while PTSD has more symptoms leaning toward emotional.  The symptoms the two disorders have in common are headaches and stomachaches.  In both cases symptoms can be so severe and last so long that it completely disrupts the person’s life.

Do you have medically unexplained physical, or somatic, symptoms?

Somatization disorder can cause a person towards an emotional reaction such as depression or even suicide because they feel so much pain and can never get a diagnosis for it.  The symptoms often lead to substance abuse.  Thereby leaving them to feel hopeless, as if they will never get the help they need.  Somatization disorder has a wide range of physical symptoms.  A person with this disorder will report many different symptoms over a period of time with no real medical explanation.  These symptoms are often pain throughout the body, but not usually all at the same time.  Pain in the form of headaches, stomach ache, joint or muscle pain.  It could also be internal, such as vomiting, or it could come about as a sexual or menstrual problem.  Neurological symptoms are also common, often occurring as problems with balance or vision and even paralysis.

Generally for a patient to be diagnosed they will have experienced a minimum of eight symptoms.  There will be a minimum number of symptoms from a given category.  An example of this is that a patient will experience four or more symptoms from the pain category, two or more symptoms from the gastrointestinal category, one or more symptoms from the sexual symptoms category, and one or more symptoms from the pseudoneurological symptoms.  When a person is showing signs of these symptoms they will be unexplainable and a medical diagnosis is not usually possible.  Generally the person will explain the pain they are having in a fashion that makes it seem as if they are in more pain than you think they should be in, as if they are over exaggerating the symptoms.

Somatization Disorder lasts for a very long time which is one thing this disorder has in common with PTSD.  PTSD symptoms can last anywhere from months to years.   Most PTSD symptoms are different from Somatization Disorder because they come from more of a psychological background than a physical background.  PTSD symptoms are generally geared more towards an emotional aspect, some examples are worry over dying, acting younger than the chronological age, having an impaired memory or obsessiveness.  It seems that PTSD actually transforms a person’s behavior instead of changing them physically.  This is because when traumatic experiences occur, the feelings they experience, such as shock, nervousness or fear continue on for a length of time and gradually get stronger.  The stronger they get the less of a normal life the person is able to lead.

These increased symptoms can include nightmares or night terrors, hypervigilance, panic attacks, hypersensitivity, low self-esteem and shattered self-confidence or a physical or mental paralysis.  There are three categories often used by clinicians in order to type or group people who are diagnosed with PTSD.  The categories used are re-living, avoiding, and increased arousal.  The people in the re-living group are people who suffer from living through the trauma they have been through over and over again.  This can happen through a flashback or a hallucination or just by being reminded even in small ways.  The people in the avoiding group tend to try to stay away from people, places or things that can remind them of the event.  Unfortunately the person can start to isolate themselves and eventually can turn completely inward from detachment.  The people in the increased arousal group lean towards either having difficulty showing their emotions or on the other end of the spectrum showing overly exaggerated emotions.  This group is also the group who has some physical symptoms such as higher blood pressure, muscle tension and nausea.

In conclusion, it has become very apparent to me that while there are some similarities between PTSD and Somatization Disorder, there are a lot more differences.  It has also become very apparent to me that the people who suffer from these disorders are dealing with a lot of pain, and whether it is physical or emotional, this pain can cause the person suffering from it to shut down and disable them from enjoying the life they were meant to lead.

References

Netherton, S.D., Holmes, D., Walker, C.E. (1999). Child and Adolescent Psychological Disorders.   New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Blaney, P.H., Millon, T. (2009). Oxford Textbook of Psychopathology.

New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

(2009, February 9). Anxiety & Panic Disorders Guide. WebMD.com. Retrieved October 5, 2009, from http://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/post-traumatic-stress-disorder

(Retrieved 2009, October 5). Somatization Disorder. Intelihealth.com.  http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtPrint/W/8271/25759/187986.html?d=dmtHealthAZ&hide=t&k=base

(Retrieved 2009, October 5). Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. AACAP.org

http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/posttraumatic_stress_disorder_ptsd

(Retrieved 2009, October 5). Somatization Disorder. PsychNet-UK.

http://www.psychnet-uk.com/dsm_iv/somatization_disorder.htm

Kinchin, D. (2005). Post Traumatic Stress Disorder The Invisible Injury.

Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 9YS, UK.  Retrieved October 5, 2009, from http://www.successunlimited.co.uk/books/ptsympt.htm

 

The Effects of Exercise on Self-Esteem


How often do we hear, “Get a workout, it will make you feel better.”?

Exercise For Life – For Your Good Health

Exercise is a very broad spectrum of activities; it can be walking, hiking, bicycling, running or any one of a number of sports.  It can also be moving along to a video that has choreographed moves geared toward a traditional exercise routine, or dancing, or Yoga and Pilates.  It could also be going to a gym and lifting weights or using the cardio equipment.

People often say you always feel better after a workout, or, if you can get some exercise in, you would feel so much better.  Is this truly the case?  How can causing your muscles to work and be sore actually help you emotionally?  Some studies that support a connection between exercise and positive self-esteem are: Physical Fitness and Enhanced Psychological Health; Associations Between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression and Suicidal Behavior Among College Students; and The Relationships Among Self-Esteem, Exercise and Self-Rated Health in Older Women.

Each study shows slightly different statistics, but come to a similar conclusion.  This would be that physical activity does help a person have an increase in self-esteem, be it through the lessening of depression symptoms, or having the ability to perceive one’s self as healthy and high functioning in older age or simply by an elevation in a person’s mood, which gives that person the chance to understand that things are better than they seemed an hour ago.  All of these things apply to a person’s self-esteem in one way or another and these studies show that exercise helps to put a positive spin on each of them.

I feel that more studies will confirm that exercise or physical activity will help increase traits in a person’s self-esteem.

References

Plante, T., & Rodin, J. (1990).  Physical fitness and enhanced psychological health.  Current Psychology,9(1), 3. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database. (Document ID: 9701290177)

Misra, R., Alexy, B., & Panigrahi, B.. (1996). The relationships among self-esteem, exercise, and self-rated health in older women. Journal of Women & Aging, 8(1), 81.  Retrieved December 30, 2009, from ProQuest Psychology Journals. (Document ID: 9825352).

Taliaferro, L., Rienzo, B., Pigg, R., Miller, M., & Dodd, V.. (2009). Associations Between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior Among College Students. Journal of American College Health, 57(4), 427-36.  Retrieved February 7, 2010, from ProQuest Psychology Journals. (Document ID: 1623326411).

Applied vs. Basic Research


The primary purpose of the study in question is to “compare adolescent and adult Deliberate Self-Harm (DSH) patients regarding factors contributing to the suicidal act.”  There were several dimensions addressed, including intentions, antecedents, depression, hopelessness, self-esteem, and other contributing factors.  (Hjelmeland & Grøholt, 2005, p. 64)

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Although “the distinction between basic and applied research is more accurately described as a continuum,” I believe this particular article favors the applied method.  (Cozby, 2009, p. 20)  Specifically, this research has practical application in the accurate diagnosis of individuals with DSH.  In contrast, basic research would attempt to “address theoretical issues concerning phenomena such as cognition, emotion, motivation, learning, psychobiology, personality development, and social behavior.”  (Cozby, 2009, p. 10)

The best clue we can use to differentiate between applied and basic research is to determine if practical implications can be envisioned into the foreseeable future.  (Cozby, 2009, p. 13)  Another possible clue is if the research attempts to address, explain, or clarify a perceived problem… like DSH for example… in which case the research type is probably applied instead of basic.  Finally, the underlying ‘purpose’ of the research can clue us into its origins.  For example, basic research arises out of curiosity, where applied research is typically born out of basic research and directly applied to an issue.  So, another potential clue we can use to identify applied research is to see if it references basic research for foundational support.

References

Cozby, P. C. (2009). Methods in behavioral research (10th ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Hjelmeland, H., & Grøholt, B. (2005). A comparative study of young and adult deliberate self-harm patients. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 26(2), 64-72. doi: 10.1027/0227-5910.26.2.64

Comparing Parnaoid Schizophrenia and Delusional Disorder


In comparing delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia I noticed that paranoid schizophrenia is actually a step or two further than delusional disorder, even though these two disorders are not related.

The delusions in delusional disorder are not out of the ordinary meaning the delusion a person is currently suffering from could actually happen, but is still considered to be slightly farfetched.  Generally the delusion is something that does not happen to a large amount of people.  The disorder is generally undetectable until the person suffering from it decides to talk about what they feel is happening to them.  This is because the person suffering from delusional disorder had no abnormal behavior and there are either no or very minimal hallucinations.  People suffering from this disorder usually have a scapegoat.  That is, they can always find a way for things that go wrong to be someone else’s fault rather than accept responsibility.  There are several subtypes of delusional disorder.  People suffering from persecutory delusional disorder believe other people are out to get them.

Erotomanic sufferers walk around proclaiming that there is someone of importance is secretly in love with them.  The grandiose delusion disorder causes a person to believe that they are extremely important, or that they have some type of super human powers.  Where the somatic delusion disorder occurs the person believes there is something significantly wrong with their own body, and with the jealous subtype the person believes their spouse has cheated on them even when there is no evidence to support that.

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Research supports findings that a genetic link to a close relative who suffers from delusional disorder is possible.  Another cause could be dysfunctional cognitive processing, in which the patient has a indistinguishable way of looking at life.  The speculations they develop are by assuming everything instead of fact checking.  Another cause could be through stress, through being unable to handle stressful situations.  Treatment for delusional disorder most often involves an antipsychotic medication and sometimes involves therapy either on an individual level or on a familiar level, but treatment is only as successful as the patient allows it to be.

Paranoid schizophrenia patients do not have hallucinations that are possible, the hallucinations these patients suffer from are a much distorted view of their own reality.  There are various symptoms for paranoid schizophrenia patients; these can include auditory hallucinations, anxiety, anger, having a patronizing manner and serious thoughts of suicide, along with suicidal behavior.  These people are less affected by these kinds of symptoms and are generally more affected by what are known as positive symptoms, which are symptoms that are point toward a loss of the knowledge of what reality is.  This usually involves an abnormal view.  While the cause of this disorder is unknown, there is evidence to imply that it is caused by a brain dysfunction and that there are factors which increase the likely hood of paranoid schizophrenia.  These factors seem to be things that people would be unable to avoid, like having a family history or being exposed to viruses in the womb or being malnourished in the womb, or having severe trauma such as childhood abuse.  Even with such early risk factors taking place, paranoid schizophrenia is not generally seen until sometime between the teenage years and the mid-thirties.

Several treatments are available for this disorder but there is no cure, so treatment is there to help people learn how to cope and to learn life skills so they can have a full and productive life.  There are medications which are antipsychotics and they have two different levels.  Tier one medications are typical and have been found to be effective in helping a patient with the positive symptoms such as delusions and hallucination.  There is a side effect of some movements which are completely uncontrolled and seem erratic.  The second generation antipsychotics are atypical and help the patient cope with hallucinations and delusions as well as helping with increasing drive.  The side effect for these medications however is a slow in the metabolism, resulting in weight gain, or worse.  Other treatments available are psychotherapy which is usually recommended with the use of medications and can include social and vocational skills training.  ECT or electroconvulsive therapy and hospitalization are also available if the patient and the therapist feel they are appropriate.  If this disorder is left untreated, adverse affects may start to become visible.  Symptoms become much worse and turn into dangerous and/or deviant behavior.  Abuse of alcohol or drugs may become prevalent, family conflicts, self destructive behavior which can then lead to poverty, homelessness and health problems.  Any of these behaviors can lead to incarceration.

These two disorders seem to have a lot of similarities but in reality they are very different in almost every way including the outcomes of each one.  A more in depth article would be able to show the variations of each in a much better light.

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References

Child and Adolescent Psychological Disorders.

Oxford Textbook of Psychopathology.

Delusional Disorder. Psych-uknet.com.  http://psychnet-uk.com/dsm_iv/delusional_disorder.htm

Paranoid Schizophrenia.  Mayoclinic.com.  http://mayoclinic.com/health/paranoid-schizophrenia/DS00862

Paranoid Schizophrenia. Schizophrenia.com  http://www.schizophrenia.com/szparanoid.htm

Eating Disorders = BIG BUSINESS


“Weight discrimination and the resulting obsession with thinness are rampant and recalcitrant.  I believe that, in order to make any kind of a dent in this field, we all need to combat these pernicious influences.”  (Netherton, Holmes, & Walker, 1999, p. 412)  Amen.  The weight of the media, the “diet food industry,” and the purveyors of a “healthy lifestyle” propagate this issue… without a doubt.  Losing weight is BIG BUISINESS, and there are huge profits to be made for those that offer obese people the glimmer of a stereotypically thin body.

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I also appreciated the acknowledgement on the pressure exerted by managed care.  Eating disorders appear to be particularly “deep seated” and ill suited for half a dozen one hour sessions.  Correcting inaccurate perceptions, relabeling cognitions of visceral and affective states, and redrawing boundaries… this kind of work takes time… more time than managed care often provides.  This is yet another example of the effect managed care will continue to have for as long as it is the primary method of seeking out psychological assistance.

I was suitably surprised at the long-term mortality rate… suggested to be over 10%.  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 399)  With a roughly 1 in 10 shot of succumbing to starvation, suicide, or electrolyte imbalance; you would think this particular set of disorders would get more research attention.  The fact that there is still limited epidemiological data is frustrating… perhaps the difficulty obtaining the data is related to the relative secrecy and shame associated with the disorders themselves?

Like the BM text, NHW jumps on the multi-determined etiology bandwagon.  It’s hard to disagree with since biological, familial, sociocultural, and personality factors all seem to be plausible.  The differences in family characteristics were particularly interesting.  “Bulimic families tend to be characterized as disengaged, chaotic, and highly conflictual and as having a high degree of life stress.”  Conversely, “anorexic families tend to be characterized as enmeshed, overprotective, and conflict avoidant.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 400)  That’s a strange clinical picture that seems to suggest that there might be a single underlying biological cause for EDs in general, but that familial and personality factors may play a role in its manifestation.

The list of comorbid disorders we need to consider during the assessment process is long and fairly inclusive.  “Depression, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, substance abuse, and personality disorders” are on the forefront of the disorders we should be checking for.  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 401)  Furthermore, NHW suggest we assess treatment history, as well as suicide attempts and self mutilative behaviors (cutters).

Pharmacological interventions employing antidepressants have been particularly successful.  This text only cites 3 studies that have employed SSRI class antidepressants, but they report “significant improvement with 60-80 mg dosages (of Prozac) compared to placebo.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 407)  I think I am going to dig deep into some more recent research to see of this trend holds up, there has to be more than three studies on it by now.

I like the idea of a behavioral contract… not just for eating disorders, but for any disorders which involve “behavior.”  I am inclined to agree with the statement “the contract provides structure and predictability.  Expectations, rewards, and consequences are delineated so that all people involved (patient, treaters, families) know what is expected at all stages of treatment.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 407)  My question is this… realistically, what “consequences” are there if we are dealing with outpatient treatment?

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Reference

Netherton, S. D., Holmes, D., & Walker, C. E. (1999). Child and adolescent psychological disorders: A comprehensive textbook. Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press.

Comorbidity: Substance Abuse Disorders (SUDs)


Comorbid, or comorbidity, is literally defined as “recurring together.”  (Shiel, Jr. & Stoppler, 2008, p. 94)  For our purposes, comorbidity will refer to cases where two or more psychiatric conditions coexist, and where one of the conditions is a substance abuse disorder (SUD).  “There are 11 groups of substances specifically discussed in the DSM-IV: alcohol; amphetamines and related sympathomimetics; caffeine; cannabis; cocaine; hallucinogens; inhalants; nicotine; opiates; phencyclidine and related drugs (PCP); and sedatives, hypnotics, and anxiolytics.”  (Colman, 2009, p. 741)  Any one of the above substances, or combination of the above substances, can contribute to and be related this discussion of comorbidity with SUDs.

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Although this list is by no means exhaustive, “long-term substance use is related to psychiatric conditions such as suicide and depression, affective disorders, eating disorders (ED), and personality disorders (PD).”  (Netherton, Holmes, & Walker, 1999, p. 248)  Increased risk of mood disorders has been documented across all substance categories and across all mood related diagnoses.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 287)  Substance-Related Disorders are commonly comorbid with many mental disorders, including Conduct Disorder in adolescents; Antisocial and Borderline Personality Disorders, Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder.  (American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 2000, p. 204)   Schneier et al. (2010) also concluded that alcohol use disorders and social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a prevalent dual diagnosis, associated with substantial rates of additional co-morbidity.

ADHD represents a risk factor for substance abuse.  ADHD patients with a high degree of nicotine consumption may be consuming large quantities as a form of self-medication.  Nicotine and alcohol, when combined, pose a markedly greater risk for the development of other addictions.  (Ohlmeier et al., 2007, p. 542)  There is “high comorbidity between heavy drinking and heavy smoking.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 266)  These admissions seem to support the premise that alcohol and nicotine continue to serve as “gateway drugs” for people whom suffer from ADHD.

“In terms of clinical presentation, a concurrent Personality Disorder (PD) diagnosis is associated with an earlier age of onset of alcohol-related problems, increased addiction severity, more secondary drug use, more psychological distress, and greater impairment in social functioning.  As for course in addiction treatment, a concurrent PD diagnosis has been associated with premature discontinuation of treatment, earlier relapse, poorer treatment response, and worse long-term outcome.”  (Zikos, Gill, & Charney, 2010, p. 66)  Cluster B (Antisocial, Borderline, Histrionic, and Narcissistic) Personality Disorders (PDs) appear to be particularly prevalent, perhaps because the link between substance dependency and antisocial behavior can be found genetically.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 263)

“Among individuals with schizophrenia, between 40% and 50% also meet criteria for one or more substance use disorders.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 288)  Comorbid substance use complicates adherence to sometimes complex schizophrenia treatment regimens.  Poor adherence to treatment results in worsening of schizophrenia symptoms, relapse, worsening of overall condition, increased utilization of health care facilities, re-hospitalization, reduced quality of life, social alienation, increased substance abuse, unemployment, violence, high rates of victimization, incarceration, and death.  (Hardeman, Harding, & Narasimhan, 2010, p. 405-406)  The compounding effect of substance abuse on the quality of life for individuals with schizophrenia can’t be understated.  Substance abuse is particularly common and also worsens the course of schizophrenia.  (Buckley, Miller, Lehrer, & Castle, 2009, p. 396)

Differential diagnosis and treatment can sometimes be a troublesome proposition.  Comorbidity complicates the diagnosis, treatment, and clinical course of Substance Abuse Disorders (SUDs).  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 287)  “If symptoms precede the onset of substance use or persist during extended periods of abstinence from the substance, it is likely that the symptoms are not substance induced.”  (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 210)  Carbaugh and Sias (2010) concluded that successful outcomes can be increased through proper diagnosis and early intervention, at least in the case of comorbid Bulimia Nervosa and substance abuse.  Prevention of substance use disorders can help alleviate or decrease much impairment in psychiatric patients in particular.  (Powers, 2007, p. 357)  Furthermore, a review of treatments for patients with severe mental illness and comorbid substance use disorders concluded that mental health treatment combined with substance abuse treatment is more effective than treatment occurring alone for either disorder or occurring concurrently without articulation between treatments.  (Hoblyn, Balt, Woodard, & Brooks, 2009, p. 54)

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References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text rev.). Washington, DC: Author.

Blaney, P. H., & Millon, T. (2009). Oxford textbook of psychopathology (2nd ed.). New York, New York: Oxford University Press.

Buckley, P. F., Miller, B. J., Lehrer, D. S., & Castle, D. J. (2009, Mar). Psychiatric comorbidities and schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 35(2), 383-402. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbn135

Carbaugh, R. J., & Sias, S. M. (2010, Apr). Comorbidity of bulimia nervosa and substance abuse: Etiologies, treatment issues, and treatment approaches. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 32(2), 125-138. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=2026599321&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Colman, A. M. (2009). Oxford dictionary of psychology (3rd ed.). Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press.

Hardeman, S. M., Harding, R. K., & Narasimhan, M. (2010, Apr). Simplifying adherence in schizophrenia. Psychiatric Services, 61(4), 405-408. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=2006767471&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hoblyn, J. C., Balt, S. L., Woodard, S. A., & Brooks, J. O. (2009, Jan). Substance use disorders as risk factors for psychiatric hospitalization in bipolar disorder. Psychiatric Services, 60(1), 50-55. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1654365811&sid=6&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Netherton, S. D., Holmes, D., & Walker, C. E. (1999). Child and adolescent psychological disorders: A comprehensive textbook. Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press.

Ohlmeier, M. D., Peters, K., Kordon, A., Seifert, J., Wildt, B. T., Weise, B., … Schneider, U. (2007, Aug). Nicotine and alcohol dependence in patients with comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Alcohol and Alcoholism : International Journal of the Medical Council on Alcoholism, 42(6), 539-543. doi: 10.1093/alcalc/agm069

Powers, R. A. (2007, May). Alcohol and drug abuse prevention. Psychiatric Annals, 37(5), 349-358. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1275282831&sid=5&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Schneier, F. R., Foose, T. E., Hasin, D. S., & Heimberg, R. G. (2010, Jun). Social anxiety disorder and alcohol use disorder co-morbidity in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Psychological Medicine, 40(6), 977-988. doi: 10.1017/S0033291709991231

Shiel, W. C., Jr., & Stoppler, M. C. (Eds.). (2008). Webster’s new world  medical dictionary (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Publishing.

Zikos, E., Gill, K. J., & Charney, D. A. (2010, Feb). Personality disorders among alcoholic outpatients: Prevalence and course in treatment. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 55(2), 65-73. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1986429431&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Substance Abuse Grab-bag


On the subject of terminology, I thought it was rather odd that NHW made the statement that “the phrases ‘chemical dependency, addiction, and habit’ are still in use but less so than ‘substance abuse, use, or misuse;’” and then later citing “changes in the thinking in the field of chemical dependency.”  (Netherton, Holmes, & Walker, 1999, p. 241)  Perhaps that’s an indication that old habits are not easily broken.

The text again acknowledges that “the use of substances to cope, alter moods, or reach another level of consciousness has been an acceptable form of communication and expression for most of humankind.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 242)  This statement alone suffices to encapsulate the difficulty of the task at hand.  Quite simply, there is a significant portion of the population that doesn’t recognize there is a problem.  “Substance use has become less stigmatizing among adolescents and is fiend less as a problem among their peers.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 242)  Check and checkmate.

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I have trouble “getting behind” the disease model for substance use and abuse.  To my eyes, substance use appears more like a behavior than a disease.  In my experience, alcoholism is typically a secondary symptom stemming from another underlying physical cause or emotional disorder.  The degree and the prevalence of comorbidity would appear to support this position.  While I don’t disagree that the behavior needs to be recognized and addressed, I believe that addressing the underlying emotional disorder is critical to the long term success of these individuals.

Other substance-related models include the developmental model, the gateway model, problem behavior theory, cognitive models, the social learning model, and finally… the addictive behavior model.  I believe that social learning weighs heavily on the adolescent mind, and I wholly support the statement that “adolescents place great value on peer opinions and struggle to fit in.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 247)  This serves as an entry point for the behavior, which then sets the tone for the addictive behavior model, which subsequently suggests that behaviors are a series of bad habits that have been over-conditioned to the extent that they become detrimental.

“Long-term substance use is related to psychiatric conditions such as suicide and depression, affective disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 248)  This is only the second time in this class where we have listed entire categories as being comorbid with a specific disorder.  Is this the first mention of dual diagnosis in this class, or have we previously addressed that?

Addressing treatment, the treatment options range from pretreatment services, through outpatient treatment, to intensive inpatient treatment and/or residential care.  “Some of the fundamental treatment services include structure, dual diagnosis capabilities, pharmacological interventions, arrangements with medical care, role modeling, client participation in the therapeutic milieu, family groups, individual and group therapy, school/vocational training, recreational programs, relapse prevention, and 12-step support.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 255)

Of the specific treatment approaches and interventions, I most identified with the harm reduction approach.  “Harm reduction, harm minimization, and risk reduction are terms that describe methods based on the assumption that habits can be placed along a continuum ranging from lowest risk to highest amount of risk.”  (Netherton et al., 1999, p. 258)  The object, or the goal, is the transition the individual along the continuum to a behavior that is less harmful.  It seems to be more progressive in its approach, with its intent to “normalize rather than marginalize substance abusers.”  I don’t think this is necessarily the ideal treatment for all people who suffer from alcohol-related problems, but I think it would be a less invasive and potentially better received option than some of the more stringent measures.

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Reference

Netherton, S. D., Holmes, D., & Walker, C. E. (1999). Child and adolescent psychological disorders: A comprehensive textbook. Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press.