Tag Archives: Major Depressive Disorder

What Effect Does Violence have on Kids? – Practical Application of Stanley Greenspan’s Theory of Emotional Development to Violent Behavior


I have chosen to apply the Theory of Emotional Development as seen by Stanley Greenspan to violent behavior.  I can see where this theory can explain how violent behavior gets embedded into a person, especially when the behavior is experienced from birth or from a young age, either by witnessing or by being victimized by violence.

Greenspan’s Theory assumes that children learn behavior by experiencing it.  The behavior would then continue into adulthood unless something drastic affects them.  It would have to be to the point that they feel they need to change the behavior.  In the case of violence, this drastic happening could be, going to jail or prison, going too far with the violence, or even being injured bad enough to be hospitalized for a while.  This of course depends on the person.

There are several assumptions from the theory that I will compare to the affects of violence on children.  I will also compare the milestones within the stages of emotional development to the stages the children go through when submerged in a violent environment.

There are also several reasons why violence would be someone’s first reaction to any situation.  There are many signs that a child could have violent tendencies, we could see these as they grow older.  Some children show behavioral problems at very young ages, their mental health status could grow worse and there are often problems academically and behaviorally throughout adolescence.

It seems that how often someone is exposed to violent behavior and the age at which they are first exposed determines the severity of the violent actions the child may eventually commit.

If a child is exposed to violence through a victim standpoint, it is most likely that as parents, the violence will be committed against their immediate family, but it is also likely that violence will be committed against outsiders as well.

If a child is exposed to violence through a witness standpoint, negative results could include becoming aggressive and having developmental challenges. Also, some criminal behavior could be seen.

There are many long-term effects that can take hold of a person when they are exposed to violence, especially if it was for a very long period of time.   These effects include depression, antisocial behavior, and substance abuse.  The child also learns to associate a positive attitude to violent behavior, if they are continually exposed.  They end up feeling as if the perpetrator is rewarded for the behavior.

In the Theory of Emotional Development one assumption is, “the capacity to organize experiences is present early in life”.  When violence is present in a person’s life, it is generally something that has been experienced from a very early time in their life.  Generally it is in the form of domestic violence toward a parent or themselves.

The violence that is experienced through the child’s life is organized when the child either accepts this behavior as normal or decides that the behavior is wrong and then fights against it.

This theory, “Assumes that initially organization is emotion based rather than cognition based”.  The research associated with violent behavior shows the learning of violence is cognition based.  It is a learned behavior in that, the more a child is exposed to various types of violence, the more likely they are to become offenders and the worse the offences become.

It also says, “Infants organize their emotions differently at different stages of ego development”.  Infants who emerge into life where violence is prevalent will organize their emotions accordingly.  These babies will startle easily, as loud noise and yelling does anyway, but then will grow into toddlers who may sense something is wrong, but will also be desensitized to the violent behavior around them.  Also, because of the actions that are prevalent in the home, they will see the violence as normal because they have no ability to compare it to others’ behavior.

This theory says, “With the maturation of the brain, interpreting progresses to higher levels of organization”.  As the child progresses into elementary school age, and they are exposed to other children’s life styles, they will begin to understand, maybe truly for the first time, that the behavior they are experiencing is wrong.

At this point, and as they grow, they will start to compare their own home life to their friends’ and then start to really organize how they feel as to whether the behavior is normal in other peoples lives.  Because they are starting to comprehend what’s happening in their household, they will generally devise a way to hide what’s happening to them in order to appear normal to everyone else.

This theory also states, “Emotional organization is acquired through relationships with those who care for the child”.  The child’s primary caretaker is generally their abuser.  Because of this, the emotions acquired in this relationship are generally those of confusion.  This is because the parent usually tells them that they are loved, but then the actions of that parent don’t agree with the words.  The child unknowingly learns to develop hate; sometimes toward the abuser and sometimes toward themselves because they feel they can never do what it takes to feel the love promised them so often.  These emotions carry through to adulthood and usually affect their own relationships, even as early as Jr. High or High School relationships.

Another assumption from this theory is, “Socialplay is the vehicle for promoting emotional organization”.  Children who live with violence in the home are more likely to try to stay away from the home as much as possible.  As soon as they realize they have an escape at a friend’s house they will make any excuse to try to go there in order to get away from either viewing the violence or becoming a victim of it.

Socialplay then becomes more and more about what their friends have access to that the child doesn’t feel they have.  These things do not necessarily have a monetary value, but emotional value.  Affection, courteousness, and other familial values are not found at home, so they take comfort in finding them in other people’s homes.

Greenspan also says, “Experiences must be age appropriate; have range, depth, and stability; and be personally unique.”  Unfortunately for children who experience violence on a daily basis there are not many age appropriate experiences.  These children quickly learn the keys to survival and how to fend for themselves.  These methods become intertwined into daily life and as the child grows, it becomes a way of life.  This is usually the start of the person committing violent acts when they are older.  It is not generally something they see as being a chosen action, but more something that just happens.

Greenspan has defined six milestones within the stages of emotional development. These milestones are self regulation, intimacy, two-way communication, complex communication, emotional ideas, and, emotional thinking.  Each of these milestones represents a phase or stage of a child’s life, and what they should accomplish during that phase where emotional development is concerned.

The first stage of emotional development is engagement.  This stage usually lasts from about three weeks of age until about eight months of age.

During this stage the “infants learn to share attention, relate to others with warmth, positive emotion, and expectation of pleasant interactions, and trust they are secure”.  This is the stage in which self regulation and intimacy are learned.  During these crucial early weeks and months of a child’s life, if they are involved in a violent environment, they would learn the opposite of what is involved in engagement.  They would eventually learn there are not many, if any, pleasant interactions and would not feel secure in their own actions.  In fact their first reaction to attention would come to be the flight reaction and then when older the fight reaction.

Two-way communication is the second stage of emotional development.  This stage usually lasts from about six months of age until about 18 months of age.  During this stage “infants learn to signal needs and intentions, comprehend others’ intentions, communicate information (motorically and verbally), make assumptions about safety, and have reciprocal interactions”.  This is the stage in which two-way communication is learned.  The children in this age group are still too young to recognize that the violence in their environment is not normal; yet, they are learning skills to survive there.  The two-way communication they are learning is how to signal their needs in the least threatening way.  Whether they are experiencing violence by witnessing it or are being abused, they learn the other person’s intentions could be painful and their safety could be compromised if not handled with care.  They carry this skill into later life when dealing with others.

The third stage of emotional development is shared meanings.  This stage usually lasts from about 18 months of age until about 36 months of age.  During this stage “children learn to relate their behaviors, sensations, and gestures to the world of ideas, engage in pretend play, intentionally use language to communicate, and begin to understand cognitive concepts”.  There are two milestones associated with this stage, complex communication and emotional ideas.  A lot of children who are exposed to violence from an early age end up learning things like complex communication at a later time than other children.  Because of this, these children sometimes develop learning disabilities which eventually become a sore spot for these children.  When other children don’t understand what is happening in that child’s life and choose to use that child’s slower development as something hurtful, the violent feelings tend to erupt as this is what that child has been taught at home.

The fourth and final stage in Greenspan’s theory is emotional thinking.  This stage usually lasts from about three years of age to about six years of age.  During this stage, “children can organize experiences and ideas, make connections among ideas, begin reality testing, gain a sense of themselves and their emotions, see themselves in space and time, and develop categories of experience”.  Emotional thinking is developed in this stage.  This is the age when children start to recognize that things in their home environment are not quite right.  They start to put together the fact that other children’s home lives do not involve violence on a regular basis.  At this point the child is still unsure of what, if anything, they can do about the violence in their own home.  This can be the turning point in a child’s life.

It can be when they subconsciously decide if they will incorporate the violence their caregiver has unknowingly taught them into their own lives and become violent with other people, or if they will become more docile and turn inward.

I feel that this theory, if taken further into research about violent behavior, would be a good one to look at in order to help predict violent tendencies in children.  If we do this we can try to incorporate treatment earlier and possibly cut out a lot of the violence we are seeing today.  The assumptions and the stages of the theory for emotional development are very helpful when looking at violence from an outside perspective.

References

Cullen, P.  (2009, May 21). Physical, emotional and sexual abuse was widespread in State institutions. The Irish Times p. 9.

Fagan, J.  (1996). The Criminalization of Domestic Violence: Promises and Limits
National Institute of Justice. Retrieved from LexisNexis database.

Nader, C. (2008, December 3). Death often tragic end to history of domestic violence.  The Age p. 11.

Murrell, A.R., Christoff, K.A., Henning, K.R. (2007, July 17).  Characteristics of Domestic Violence Offenders: Associations with Childhood Exposure to Violence.                                  J Fam Viol, 22:523-532

Appleyard, K., Egeland, B., van Dulmen, M.H.M., Sroufe, L.A. (2004. February 2). When more is not better: the role of cumulative risk in child behavior outcomes. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 46:3, 235-245

Bergen, D. (2008). Human Development Traditional and Contemporary Theories. Pearson Prentice Hall.

Is There More Than One Kind Of Depression?


Dysthymic Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder are actually two different versions of depression.  Dysthymic Disorder is noted for chronic depression.

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The definition for Dysthymic Disorder is that it is a “mood disorder with chronic depressive symptoms that are present most of the day, more days than not, for a period of at least two years.”  (Minddisorders.com).  The symptoms are usually present for years and can include low self esteem, decreased motivation, change in sleeping patterns and change in appetite patterns.  Causes of this type of depression are things like a person’s upbringing.  If a person is brought up in a home where abuse is prevalent an adult can suffer from depression for their entire life.  Treatment for this type of depression is generally psychotherapy but sometimes is combined with antidepressants.

Similarly Major Depressive Disorder is the next level of depression and is defined as, “a condition characterized by a long lasting depressed mood or marked loss of interest or pleasure in all or nearly all activities” (Minddisorder.com).   This form of depression has an intense impact on a person’s life.  It usually comes about when a person suffers a traumatic event, but this does not always happen.  Symptoms can include a disturbed mood throughout most of the day, a change in the sleep pattern, a change in the appetite pattern, a loss of interest in things that are considered pleasurable, but then go further to include problems when trying to concentrate or think in depth, psychomotor retardation or agitation and thoughts of suicide.  If this form of depression is left untreated it can last longer than four months and recurrence is eminent.  Treatments for Major Depressive Disorder include psychotherapy or talk therapy, electroconvulsive therapy or ECT and antidepressant medications or a combination of these treatments.

Nearly everything about these two disorders are similar, the main difference is that major depressive disorder is an extension of Dysthymic Disorder in that symptoms and moods are more severe therefore treatments need to be more involved and more inclusive.

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References:

Netherton, S.D., Holmes, D., Walker, C.E., Child and Adolescent Psychological Disorders

Blaney, P.H., Millon, T., Oxford Textbook of Psychopathology.

Depression (Major Depressive Disorder) http://psychcentral.com/disorders/sx22.htm

Dysthymic Disorder. minddisorder.com.  http://www.minddisorders.com/Del-Fi/Dysthymic-disorder.html

Dissociative Identity Disorder. Psychnet-uk.com. http://www.psychnet-uk.com/dsm_iv/dissociative_identity_disorder.htm

Major Depressive Disorder. minddisorder.com. http://www.minddisorders.com/Kau-Nu/Major-depressive-disorder.html

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) treatment options – Examining the STAR*D Trial


When weighing the effectiveness of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) treatment options, the most logical place to start is the largest open-label pragmatic trial ever rendered; The Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial.  The STAR*D trial concluded that there were no statistically significant differences in short term remission or response rates between tested treatment options, including both CBT and pharmacological remedies, but that some treatment options had advantages over others in terms of side effects and/or mean time to remission.  (Sinyor, Schaffer, & Levitt, 2010)

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There are many different flavors of CBTs intended to treat mood disorders.  Those flavors include those predominantly focused on learning theory or behavioral activation (BA), predominantly cognitive models such as Cognitive Therapy (CT/CBT), and models incorporating additional elements such as Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System Psychotherapy (CBASP) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MCBT).  (Meyer & Scott, 2008, p. 685)  CBT, when practiced by inexperienced STAR*D clinicians, was at least equally effective in short term follow-ups when compared with pharmacological remedies.  CBT was also associated with significantly fewer side effects.  Those facts alone should serve as reasonable justification in recommending CBT over all other treatment methods.

CBT was associated with longer times to remission when compared with pharmacological remedies, when they were effective, so if speed of improvement is of critical importance the client could potentially benefit the pharmacological treatment option.  Despite the apparent speed with which the pharmacological agents worked, choosing which drug is no easy task.  STAR*D found no clear medication “winner” for patients whose depression does not remit after one or more aggressive medication trials.  (Gaynes, Warden, Trivedi, & Wisniewski, 2009, p. 1443)  Matter of fact, every drug and combination of drugs showed the same effect as every other drug and drug combination.  (Leventhal & Antonuccio, 2009)  Some studies suggest that use of multiple antidepressant medications may double the likelihood of remission compared with use of a single medication.  (Blier, Ward, Tremblay, & Laberge, 2010)  Guess who funded that study?

There is increasing evidence that the biological explanation and pharmacological treatment of depressions is a failure.  STAR*D provides compelling evidence to that the placebo effect is the prime explanation for favorable outcomes that occur with antidepressants.  Of the patients that were found to respond positively to pharmacotherapy on the short term, the STAR*D study found that at the end of a year’s time almost all of the patients (97%) had either relapsed or dropped out.  (Leventhal & Antonuccio, 2009)  Even if we continue to leverage the pharmacological remedies, the long-range outcomes of clients with MDD are better when CBT is included, regardless of whether CBT is concurrent with or follows pharmacotherapy.  (Friedman, Wright, Jarrett, & Thase, 2006, p. 327)  The beneficial effects of CBT persist several years into post treatment and are strongly associated with preventing relapse (Kuyken, Dalgleish, & Holden, 2007), especially among individuals discontinuing medication use.  (Friedman, 2004)

As controversial as they are, “brain stimulation therapies” like electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) are effective in days, not weeks, and most have a higher response rate than any treatment tested in the STAR*D trial.  (Insel & Wang, 2009)  While ECT is still the gold standard in brain stimulation therapies, clinicians now have a growing list of FDA approved brain stimulation interventions. “These interventions include new modifications of ECT, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, implanted cortical stimulation, and others on the horizon.”  (Lisanby & Novakovic, 2009, p. 734)  Studies that utilized brain stimulation therapies to treat depression revealed significant increases in the release of norepinephrine as well as increased serotonergic activity, both of which are purported to have antidepressant effects.  (Weaver, 2009)  However, ECT is use is “limited by its invasive nature, which includes the requirement of general anesthesia and the risk of retrograde amnesia, which may be irreversible in some patients.”  (Rot, Mathew, & Charney, 2009, p. 311)  As a result, brain stimulation therapies are usually reserved for cases where depression is resistant to conventional treatments.  In addition, use of brain stimulation therapy is entirely dependent on the prescribing clinician believing in a tenuous underlying premise that norepinephrine plays a key role in depression onset and recurrence.

It would suffice to say that I favor the CBT methodology of treatment for unipolar depression, in most, if not all cases.  Personally, I would endeavor to enhance the CBT experience by utilizing cutting edge technological alternatives to traditional CBT… like virtual reality, or VR, simulations.  VR simulations are computer generated environments constructed to elicit an appropriate emotional response from clients… responses we as therapists can use in therapy.  (David, 2010)  Coupling responses that rival in vivo responses with well trained and knowledgeable CBT methods, we could usher in a new alternative to the placebo effect that passes for pharmacological intervention today.  The failure of antidepressants to provide lasting benefit, and the underlying truth that 100 years of research has failed to identify an underlying physical cause for mental disorders (including depression) leads me to believe that a “biopsychosocial model may be more useful than a disease model for conceptualizing and treating depression.”  (Leventhal & Antonuccio, 2009, p. 199)

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References

Blier, P., Ward, H. E., Tremblay, P., & Laberge, L. (2010, Mar). Combination of antidepressant medications from treatment initiation for major depressive disorder: A double-blind randomized study. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 167(3), 281-288. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1976013231&sid=18&Fmt=4&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

David, D. (2010, Mar). Cutting edge deveopments in psychology: Virtual reality applications. Interview with two leading experts. Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies, 10(1), 115-126. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=2010171911&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Friedman, E. S., Wright, J. H., Jarrett, R. B., & Thase, M. E. (2006, May). Combining cognitive therapy and medication for mood disorders. Psychiatric Annals, 36(5), 320-329. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1069483751&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Friedman, M. A. (2004, Spring). Combined psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 11(1), 47-68. Retrieved from http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?index=40&did=526558591&SrchMode=1&sid=5&Fmt=10&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1272666830&clientId=4683

Gaynes, B. N., Warden, D., Trivedi, M. H., & Wisniewski, S. R. (2009, Nov). What did STAR*D teach us? Results from a large-scale, practical, clinical trial for patients with depression. Psychiatric Services, 60(11), 1439-1445. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1921563151&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Insel, T. R., & Wang, P. S. (2009, Nov). The STAR*D trial: Revealing the need for better treatments. Psychiatric Services, 60(11), 1466-1467. Retrieved from http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?index=28&did=1921563061&SrchMode=1&sid=6&Fmt=6&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1272667182&clientId=4683

Kuyken, W., Dalgleish, T., & Holden, E. R. (2007, Jan). Advances in cognitive-behavioural therapy for unipolar depression. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 52(1), 5-14. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1203220561&sid=5&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Leventhal, A. M., & Antonuccio, D. O. (2009). On chemical imbalances, antidepressants, and the diagnosis of depression. Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 11(3), 199-214. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1923231211&sid=19&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Lisanby, S. H., & Novakovic, V. (2009, Jun). Brain stimulation therapies for clinicians. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 166(6), 734-736. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1738370431&sid=14&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Meyer, T. D., & Scott, J. (2008, Nov). Cognitive behavioural therapy for mood disorders. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 36(6), 685-693. doi: 10.1017/S1352465808004761

Rot, M. A., Mathew, S. J., & Charney, D. S. (2009, Feb 3). Neurobiological mechanisms in major depressive disorder. Canadian Medical Association. Journal, 180(3), 305-313. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1634710771&sid=14&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Sinyor, M., Schaffer, A., & Levitt, A. (2010, Mar). The sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression (STAR*D) trial: A review. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 55(3), 126-136. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=2016794701&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Weaver, D. F. (2009, Summer). Self-induced “therapeutic seizures” for the treatment of depression. The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 21(3), 355-357. Retrieved from http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?index=71&did=1868802651&SrchMode=1&sid=14&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1272668233&clientId=4683

Differential Diagnosis – Dysthymic Disorder vs. Major Depressive Disorder


The differential diagnosis of Dysthymic Disorder (DD, also known as depressive neurosis, minor depression disorder, or neurotic depression) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is made difficult because they share the same symptom constellations.  The word ‘Dysthymic’ is of Greek origin, literally translating into “resembling a bad (or abnormal) spirit.”  (Colman, 2009, p. 234)  “In Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), the depressed mood must be present for most of the day, nearly every day, for a period of at least 2 weeks, whereas Dysthymic Disorder (DD) must be present for more days than not over a period of at least 2 years.”  (American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 2000, p. 374)  Thus, we can visualize DD as a chronic, yet less severe type of depression that typically persists for many years.  Clients with DD may report that they do not recall being depressed and they may lead fully functional lives… as a result, it may be exceedingly difficult to distinguish DD from the client’s usual functioning or personality type.  The bottom line is that the onset, persistence, and severity of depression episodes are not easily evaluated retrospectively.

The DSM-IV-TR, the diagnostic tool of choice for clinicians, sums up differential diagnosis best.  “If the initial onset of chronic depressive symptoms is of sufficient severity and number to meet the full criteria for a Major Depressive Episode, the diagnosis would be Major Depressive Disorder, Chronic (if the full criteria are still met, or Major Depressive Disorder, In Partial Remission (if the full criteria are no longer met).  The diagnosis of DD can be made following MDD only if the DD was established prior to the first Major Depressive Episode (i.e., no Major Depressive Episodes during the first 2 years of dysthymic symptoms), or if there has been a full remission of the MDD lasting (i.e., lasting at least 2 months) before the onset of the DD.”  (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 379)

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This distinction is further complicated by the diagnoses of mood disorder due to a general medical condition and substance-induced mood disorders, both of which are rather self explanatory.  It is also worth noting that depressive symptoms are frequently associated with chronic Psychotic Disorders like Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder.  A separate diagnosis of DD is not made of the symptoms occur exclusively during the course of the Psychotic Disorder.  (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 380)

Beyond the typical differential diagnosis techniques, some have suggested that Axis II personality dimensions (PDs) can be utilized in the differential diagnosis of Axis I Depression disorders.  “Personality dimensions are on the forefront of discussions regarding how to improve diagnostic clarification, and may provide a useful way in which to understand and model the comorbidities among and between Axis I and II conditions.”  (Bagby, Quilty, & Ryder, 2008, expression Conclusions)  Not only can PDs have significant impact on the diagnosis process, but they can dramatically alter the course of treatment.  For example, Bagby and associates (2008) found that neurotic personalities respond better to pharmacotherapy when compared to psychotherapy.  Inevitably, to be effective at diagnosis and treatment, we need to consider more than just the DSM-IV-TR… we need to individualize treatment plans based on a true representation of the individual client.  That representation, in my opinion, must include the underlying PDs that compose the fabric of the human experience.

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References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text rev.). Washington, DC: Author.

Bagby, R. M., Quilty, L. C., & Ryder, A. C. (2008, Jan). Personality and depression. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 53(1), 14-26. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1426048691&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Colman, A. M. (2009). Oxford dictionary of psychology (3rd ed.). Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press.