Tag Archives: Factitious Disorder

Can Symptoms Be False?


Having a person come into a clinician’s office and presenting with symptoms of one or more disorders can be a tricky process for the clinician to try to diagnose, even without the presence of factitious symptoms.  The presence of factitious symptoms can make the diagnosis very complicated because the clinician would need to have the patient go through their history, which would be a normal step, but then if the clinician suspects any kind of factitious disorder, generally a more thorough history would be required.  Because the person feels a need to continue to be sick they would be complaining of the same symptoms over and over again, or possibly complaining of the symptoms getting worse.  The problem would be that there isn’t anything real to back it up.  A misdiagnosis would come into play, probably several times. It could be possible that factitious disorders are responsible for the averages given when it comes to the length of time it takes to diagnose.

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People who suffer from factitious disorder don’t have an ulterior motive, people who malinger do.  Malingering is when someone gives factitious symptoms in order to gain something.  Malingering generally causes a person to choose not to follow a Doctor’s reference for psychiatric care.  In rare cases when someone who is malingering does choose to seek psychiatric help, the sessions don’t offer any kind of help to further the person’s treatment.  There are various things that motivate a person to malinger.  These could include trying to gain material items such as a car or jewelry or to win a lawsuit for monetary value.  It could also be something as simple as to gain someone’s attention.

Between having patients come in with factitious symptoms either controlled or uncontrolled and people who are malingering, it is easy to see how a clinician would need to be extremely cautious when it comes to giving a diagnosis.

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References: Malingering. Psychnet-uk.com.;  The Unexplained. Bellevue.edu

Somatoform Disorders


 

 

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Somatoform Disorders could be summed up in the following statement… “there are more questions than answers.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 499)  As a collection of disorders, it appears as though they don’t belong under the same heading or classification.  Many have more in common with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) than they have with each other.

“The common feature of the somatoform disorders is the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition and are not fully explained by a general medical condition, nor by the direct effects of substance, or by another mental disorder.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 483)  Somatoform can only be diagnosed by the process of exclusion… which seems odd to me.  It represents a “curve ball” for medical and mental health professionals, because the underlying consensus is that the client “believes they have an ailment, but they don’t.”  I don’t use “very, very” very often, but this has to make it very, very difficult to diagnose.  It might give some explanation to the very low prevalence rates.

I would have expected a greater degree of stress or anxiety in a patient that presents with this disorder, as would be typical of someone who presents with symptoms that can’t be explained.  “Patients with these disorders typically experience little or no anxiety, whereas those with so-called preoccupation disorders are excessively concerned or anxious about the notion that there is something physically wrong with their bodies.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 483)  Can we use this lack of anxiety as a “flag” for diagnosis?

The “sick role” seems to be an underlying sociological construct among all the somatoform disorders.  Sick role implies granted privileges (staying home from work) and avoidance of obligations because one has to comply with medical instructions.

I was particularly interested and enthralled with the cultural differences in the presentation of Conversion Disorder (CD).  Not only is it more prevalent among rural residents from low socioeconomic backgrounds, but there is remarkable differences between geographical areas.  The text cited frequent cases of “burning hands” in Asia, which are typically never reported in the Western world.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 487)

Pain disorder is another anomaly.  What surprised me is that typical clients don’t come to treatment because of the degree or intensity of the perceived pain, but are more likely to come seeking respite from the psychological costs of pain management.  I could anticipate that this would be one of the most debilitating somatoform disorders because of its ability to disconnect clients from family, friends, work, and recreation.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 487)

I was relatively familiar with the concept of hypochondriasis before reading the text, but I was wholly unaware of the underlying theoretical etiology.  The concept of increased sensitivity to innocuous bodily sensations is new to me.  I was aware that some clients have formed selective attention to illness formation, risk perception, and misinterpretation of benign symptoms.  The suggestion that it is triggered by critical incidents, and is predispositioned by parental attitudes rings true to me.  I was also suitably surprised by the transient nature of the disorder, since it can apparently go into full remission and then appear again when a stressor appears.

Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is fascinating, quite honestly I have never heard of it.  I think this probably has more to do with societal views of “what is beautiful” than we think.  I was not at all surprised by the suggestion that some believe it to be delusional in nature.  I am a “perfectionist type” myself, but I never in my life would have dreamed this could be one of the results of that predisposition.  The text suggests that it may be compounded by being teased or bullied as a teenager (during puberty), leading to a general lack of social skills and self conscious maladaptive behavior.

Factitious Disorder is when “physical symptoms are produced or feigned intentionally to assume the sick role.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 492)  The concept of “hospital hopping” in effort to undergo medical procedures, even surgery, is amazing.  The fact that these patients frequently lie about the nature of their symptoms, and life circumstance in general, probably contribute to the difficulty of diagnosing and treating this disorder.  I mean, how can you believe them?  I would question everything that came out of their mouth, it might be increasingly difficult to sort out “real issues” from “fake ones.”

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Reference

Blaney, P. H., & Millon, T. (2009). Oxford textbook of psychopathology (2nd ed.). New York, New York: Oxford University Press.