Tag Archives: Bipolar Disorder

Eating Disorders


“Eating disorders (EDs) are polysymptomatic syndromes, defined by maladaptive attitudes and behaviors around eating, weight, and body image.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 431)  The primary disorders in this category are anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and eating disorders no otherwise specified (EDNOS).  Examples of EDNOS might include “AN-like” with preoccupations with thinness, normal-weight people purging food without binging or simply binging without purging (Binge Eating Disorder, or BED).  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 432)

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Epidemiological data suggests that EDs occur more often in women than in men (by a factor of roughly 10); although there is some evidence indicating that the gender gap is closing.  Although AN/BN tend to be most prevalent in late adolescence and early adulthood, BED defies the stereotype by manifesting in an older age group (typically around 40 years of age).  There is also little linkage to socioeconomic status, despite the common belief that Eds are disorders of the affluent.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 433)  This totally astounds me… how can people who are already undernourished give up what sustenance they are offered?

EDs frequently co-occur with mood, anxiety, substance-abuse, personality, and other psychiatric disorders.  There are so many comorbid mood disorders noted in individuals with EDs that it is easier to exclude mood disorder (singular) that is unrelated… bi-polar disorders.  Personally, I believe the single mood disorder that is currently excluded should be considered.  “The disorders are believe to depend on similar family/developmental determinants (e.g., attachment problems or trauma), and both have been thought to have similar neurobiological substrates.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 434)  Social phobias and OCD were among the most prevalent anxiety related comorbid disorders.  Since anxiety disorders often precede ED onset, it has been suggested that an anxious or obsessive-compulsive attitude predisposes an individual to ED development.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 435)

Not only are PTSD and substance abuse disorders often comorbid with EDs, but they are often comorbid with each other.  “Substance abusers in an eating-disordered population show significantly more Social Phobia, Panic Disorder, and Personality Disorders.  In addition, comorbid substance abuse was found to predict elevations in Major Depression, Anxiety Disorders, Cluster B personality disorders, as well as greater impulsivity and perfectionism.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 435)

Finally, personality disorders are frequently present in individuals whom suffer from EDs.  Restrictive type EDs seem to be associated with Anxious-Fearful PD diagnosis (anxiousness, orderliness, introversion, preference for sameness and control).  Binge-purge types have a pronounced affinity for the dramatic-erratic PDs including attention/sensation seeking, extroversion, mood lability, and proneness to excitability or impulsivity.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 435)

EDs are assumed to be multiply determined by complex interactions including constitutional factors, psychological/developmental processes, social factors, and secondary effects in the biological, psychological and social spheres of maladaptive eating practices themselves.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 443)  All of the above features generally manfest in eating-specific cognitions related to bodily appearance and appetite regulation, body image or weight considerations, and social values that heighten concerns with all of the above.  As a result, it is currently conceived that EDs represent a “tightly woven” expression of causes and symptoms that have an interrelationship between and among each other.

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Reference

Blaney, P. H., & Millon, T. (2009). Oxford textbook of psychopathology (2nd ed.). New York, New York: Oxford University Press.

Comorbidity: Substance Abuse Disorders (SUDs)


Comorbid, or comorbidity, is literally defined as “recurring together.”  (Shiel, Jr. & Stoppler, 2008, p. 94)  For our purposes, comorbidity will refer to cases where two or more psychiatric conditions coexist, and where one of the conditions is a substance abuse disorder (SUD).  “There are 11 groups of substances specifically discussed in the DSM-IV: alcohol; amphetamines and related sympathomimetics; caffeine; cannabis; cocaine; hallucinogens; inhalants; nicotine; opiates; phencyclidine and related drugs (PCP); and sedatives, hypnotics, and anxiolytics.”  (Colman, 2009, p. 741)  Any one of the above substances, or combination of the above substances, can contribute to and be related this discussion of comorbidity with SUDs.

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Although this list is by no means exhaustive, “long-term substance use is related to psychiatric conditions such as suicide and depression, affective disorders, eating disorders (ED), and personality disorders (PD).”  (Netherton, Holmes, & Walker, 1999, p. 248)  Increased risk of mood disorders has been documented across all substance categories and across all mood related diagnoses.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 287)  Substance-Related Disorders are commonly comorbid with many mental disorders, including Conduct Disorder in adolescents; Antisocial and Borderline Personality Disorders, Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder.  (American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 2000, p. 204)   Schneier et al. (2010) also concluded that alcohol use disorders and social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a prevalent dual diagnosis, associated with substantial rates of additional co-morbidity.

ADHD represents a risk factor for substance abuse.  ADHD patients with a high degree of nicotine consumption may be consuming large quantities as a form of self-medication.  Nicotine and alcohol, when combined, pose a markedly greater risk for the development of other addictions.  (Ohlmeier et al., 2007, p. 542)  There is “high comorbidity between heavy drinking and heavy smoking.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 266)  These admissions seem to support the premise that alcohol and nicotine continue to serve as “gateway drugs” for people whom suffer from ADHD.

“In terms of clinical presentation, a concurrent Personality Disorder (PD) diagnosis is associated with an earlier age of onset of alcohol-related problems, increased addiction severity, more secondary drug use, more psychological distress, and greater impairment in social functioning.  As for course in addiction treatment, a concurrent PD diagnosis has been associated with premature discontinuation of treatment, earlier relapse, poorer treatment response, and worse long-term outcome.”  (Zikos, Gill, & Charney, 2010, p. 66)  Cluster B (Antisocial, Borderline, Histrionic, and Narcissistic) Personality Disorders (PDs) appear to be particularly prevalent, perhaps because the link between substance dependency and antisocial behavior can be found genetically.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 263)

“Among individuals with schizophrenia, between 40% and 50% also meet criteria for one or more substance use disorders.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 288)  Comorbid substance use complicates adherence to sometimes complex schizophrenia treatment regimens.  Poor adherence to treatment results in worsening of schizophrenia symptoms, relapse, worsening of overall condition, increased utilization of health care facilities, re-hospitalization, reduced quality of life, social alienation, increased substance abuse, unemployment, violence, high rates of victimization, incarceration, and death.  (Hardeman, Harding, & Narasimhan, 2010, p. 405-406)  The compounding effect of substance abuse on the quality of life for individuals with schizophrenia can’t be understated.  Substance abuse is particularly common and also worsens the course of schizophrenia.  (Buckley, Miller, Lehrer, & Castle, 2009, p. 396)

Differential diagnosis and treatment can sometimes be a troublesome proposition.  Comorbidity complicates the diagnosis, treatment, and clinical course of Substance Abuse Disorders (SUDs).  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 287)  “If symptoms precede the onset of substance use or persist during extended periods of abstinence from the substance, it is likely that the symptoms are not substance induced.”  (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 210)  Carbaugh and Sias (2010) concluded that successful outcomes can be increased through proper diagnosis and early intervention, at least in the case of comorbid Bulimia Nervosa and substance abuse.  Prevention of substance use disorders can help alleviate or decrease much impairment in psychiatric patients in particular.  (Powers, 2007, p. 357)  Furthermore, a review of treatments for patients with severe mental illness and comorbid substance use disorders concluded that mental health treatment combined with substance abuse treatment is more effective than treatment occurring alone for either disorder or occurring concurrently without articulation between treatments.  (Hoblyn, Balt, Woodard, & Brooks, 2009, p. 54)

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References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text rev.). Washington, DC: Author.

Blaney, P. H., & Millon, T. (2009). Oxford textbook of psychopathology (2nd ed.). New York, New York: Oxford University Press.

Buckley, P. F., Miller, B. J., Lehrer, D. S., & Castle, D. J. (2009, Mar). Psychiatric comorbidities and schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 35(2), 383-402. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbn135

Carbaugh, R. J., & Sias, S. M. (2010, Apr). Comorbidity of bulimia nervosa and substance abuse: Etiologies, treatment issues, and treatment approaches. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 32(2), 125-138. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=2026599321&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Colman, A. M. (2009). Oxford dictionary of psychology (3rd ed.). Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press.

Hardeman, S. M., Harding, R. K., & Narasimhan, M. (2010, Apr). Simplifying adherence in schizophrenia. Psychiatric Services, 61(4), 405-408. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=2006767471&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hoblyn, J. C., Balt, S. L., Woodard, S. A., & Brooks, J. O. (2009, Jan). Substance use disorders as risk factors for psychiatric hospitalization in bipolar disorder. Psychiatric Services, 60(1), 50-55. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1654365811&sid=6&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Netherton, S. D., Holmes, D., & Walker, C. E. (1999). Child and adolescent psychological disorders: A comprehensive textbook. Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press.

Ohlmeier, M. D., Peters, K., Kordon, A., Seifert, J., Wildt, B. T., Weise, B., … Schneider, U. (2007, Aug). Nicotine and alcohol dependence in patients with comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Alcohol and Alcoholism : International Journal of the Medical Council on Alcoholism, 42(6), 539-543. doi: 10.1093/alcalc/agm069

Powers, R. A. (2007, May). Alcohol and drug abuse prevention. Psychiatric Annals, 37(5), 349-358. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1275282831&sid=5&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Schneier, F. R., Foose, T. E., Hasin, D. S., & Heimberg, R. G. (2010, Jun). Social anxiety disorder and alcohol use disorder co-morbidity in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Psychological Medicine, 40(6), 977-988. doi: 10.1017/S0033291709991231

Shiel, W. C., Jr., & Stoppler, M. C. (Eds.). (2008). Webster’s new world  medical dictionary (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Publishing.

Zikos, E., Gill, K. J., & Charney, D. A. (2010, Feb). Personality disorders among alcoholic outpatients: Prevalence and course in treatment. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 55(2), 65-73. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1986429431&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Paranoid Schizophrenia vs Delusional Disorder


Analysis of the common psychopathological features in the various psychotic disorders suggest that symptoms can be clustered into five main categories: (Os & Kapur, 2009, p. 635)

1)      Psychosis, encompassing positive symptoms of delusions and hallucinations.

2)      Alterations in drive and volition, encompassing negative symptoms including lack of motivation, reduction in spontaneous speech, and social withdrawal.

3)      Alterations in neurocognition, encompassing cognitive symptoms including difficulties in memory, attention, and executive functioning.

4)      Affective dysregulation giving rise to depressive symptoms or 5) manic (bipolar) symptoms.

The term schizophrenia is typically applied to a syndrome that is characterized by a long duration, bizarre delusions, negative symptoms, and few affective symptoms (non-affective psychosis).  (Os & Kapur, 2009)  Formerly called dementia praecox, some of its associated features include inappropriate affect, anhedonia, dysphoric mood, lack of insight, depersonalization, and delrealization.  (Colman, 2009, p. 674)  Schizophrenia affects approximately 0.7% of the world’s population, with prevalence greater in men throughout adulthood, but equal by the end of the risk period.  Schizophrenia is highly heritable, with onset being rare before adolescence or after middle age (although men become ill earlier in life than women).  (MacDonald & Schulz, 2009, p. 495)  Schizophrenia subtypes include paranoid, disorganized, catatonic, undifferentiated, and residual types.  This article will focus on paranoid schizophrenia, which tends to be the least severe subtype of schizophrenia.

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“The essential feature of the Paranoid Type of Schizophrenia is the presence of prominent delusions or auditory hallucinations” where no disorganized speech, disorganized or catatonic behaviors, or flat or inappropriate affect is present.  (American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 2000, p. 313)  Differential diagnosis is an exclusionary process since of all the other subtypes must be eliminated before diagnosing the paranoid subtype.  Paranoid schizophrenia sufferers typically have delusions that are persecutory and/or grandiose; they also typically have a recurrent theme.  Hallucinations are usually related to the same content theme as the delusions, and may include the associate features of anxiety, anger, aloofness, and/or argumentativeness.  Onset tends to be later in life when compared with other subtypes of schizophrenia, and the distinguishing characteristics are often more stable over time.  The prognosis is considerably better when compared with other schizophrenia subtypes, especially regarding occupational functioning and independent living.  (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 314)

“The essential feature of Delusional Disorder is the presence of one or more non-bizarre delusions that persist for at least 1 month.”  (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 323)  Bizarreness is mostly subjective since it is contingent on socio-cultural norms and expectations.  Bizarre delusions (as in schizophrenia) are “clearly implausible, not understandable, and not derived from ordinary life experiences.”  (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 324)  In contrast, non-bizarre delusions (as in delusional disorder) involve situations that could conceivably happen in real life… like being followed, poisoned, etc.  Subtypes of delusional disorder are categorized based on the content of the delusions or the theme thereof.  They include erotomanic, grandiose, jealous, persecutory, somatic, mixed, and unspecified types.  This essay will focus on persecutory delusions, although persecutory delusions often coexist with and are comorbid with other delusion types (particularly grandiose, in mixed presentation).

A determination of persecutory delusions is complicated by the fact that the incidence of persecutory thoughts is relatively common among the general population.  (Brown, 2008, p. 165)  “The criteria used to distinguish between these different categories of psychotic disorder are based on duration, dysfunction, associated substance use, bizarreness of delusions, and presence of depression or mania.”  (Os & Kapur, 2009, p. 635)  In delusional disorders, distortions of reality coexist with realms of rational, realistic thinking.  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 361)  Delusional disorders are distinguished from schizophrenia by the absence of active phase symptoms of schizophrenia (e.g. prominent auditory or visual hallucinations, bizarre delusions, disorganized speech, grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior, and/or negative symptoms).  “Compared with schizophrenia, delusional disorder usually produces less impairment in occupational and social functioning.”  (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 327)

“The assessment of bizarreness is generally absent among lists of delusion dimensions, notwithstanding its key role in the distinction between DD and PS.”  (Blaney & Millon, 2009, p. 365)  To improve decision-making and reduce the chance of misdiagnosis, Brown (2008) suggests we ascertain, to the extent available, base rates of the specific persecutory beliefs (e.g. discrimination and harassment, mental illness stigma, criminal victimization, relationship infidelities, conspiracies, stalking, surveillance, poisoning, etc) in our area.  Secondly, he suggests we consider alternative hypotheses, especially in decisions that have a very low base rate.  While actively searching for disconfirming information, we should postpone decisions until further information is collected.  I agree with his suggestion that we should rely more on information, and less on intuition, when it comes to confirming or disconfirming persecutory beliefs.  (Brown, 2008, p. 172)

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References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text rev.). Washington, DC: Author.

Blaney, P. H., & Millon, T. (2009). Oxford textbook of psychopathology (2nd ed.). New York, New York: Oxford University Press.

Brown, S. A. (2008). The reality of persecutory beliefs: Base rate information for clinicians. Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 10(3), 163-179. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1646112241&sid=7&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Colman, A. M. (2009). Oxford dictionary of psychology (3rd ed.). Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press.

MacDonald, A. W., & Schulz, S. C. (2009, May ). What we know: Findings that every theory of schizophrenia should explain. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 35(3), 493-508. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbp017

Os, J. V., & Kapur, S. (2009, Aug 22-Aug 28). Schizophrenia. The Lancet, 374(9690), 635-645. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1843730411&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Response to: Growing up bipolar: ‘Nobody was on my side’ (CNN)


CNN published an insightful piece on Bipolar Disorder today (see link below) that hit a few significant points that have been under expressed here of late…  I have to credit the author (Elizabeth Landau) because she acknowledged that the spike in bipolar disorder diagnosis rates could be attributed to our collective focus on the disorder.

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I would also like to demonstrate support for the ‘mind over meds’ concept that is purveyed when the author suggests “as a first line of defense, family support and therapy would be given to the child and problematic environments — be it home or school — would be improved, and then medication would be given as needed.”  Medication should be a last resort, especially when it comes to psychotropic drugs.  It is widely acknowledged that there is no psychotropic drug that comes without significant potential for side effects.  Regardless of our theoretical perspective… Cognitive Behavioral – Dialectical Behavioral – Gestalt – Group – Psychoanalytic – Talk… or the other variations of therapy… I would submit that the best case scenario for medication is as an adjunct treatment… adjunct to traditional therapy services.  What’s not to like about no side effects?

Last, but certainly not lest, CNN provides another voice to the growing crowd of providers who are frustrated by a general lack of access when it comes to individuals without insurance.  All men are created equal. Those five words used to mean something.  Unfortunately, those of us who are wading through the fragmented mess we call a mental health system in the United States know… it’s exactly what the author of the article purports it to be…

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Link to the original article:

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/08/30/bipolar.kids/index.html?hpt=C2