B.F. Skinner – Baby in a Box


The baby in a box project performed by B.F. Skinner is testament to power of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA).  It is remarkable that Aircribs didn’t get picked up and massively produced considering the improvements in the lives of the owners that come as a result of use.  What impressed me the most was the precision of the experiment despite all indications that such an undertaking would surely succumb to the scope of the undertaking.  With some many confounding variables that remain unaccounted for (individual differences between babies, parents, environments) he managed to put together what I consider to be a pretty convincing argument.  How often do people get published without going through the peer-review grinder?

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The Aircrib represents a state of the art solution to one of the most troubling social ills of modern childrearing… quite honestly, I don’t understand why the resistance to this breakthrough?  The correlation between maintaining a regulated environment for infants and health seems to pass the common-sense “eye test.”  What would have made this particular research effort interesting is if baby skinner had a twin that was raised in a more “traditional” fashion.  I don’t mean to diminish the quality of the work that was done, but having a control group would have given him the opportunity to measure net change from baseline.

The frustrating part of the research is that it is suitably difficult to determine which variable is contributing to the behavior change… Skinner is manipulating a lot of variables at once… temperature, light, sound, presence of clothing, etc.  It would have been nice if Skinner had isolated specific variables and given us insight into which specific independent variables had effect on the measured dependant variables… like regular sleep or regular bowel movements.  There is no indication as to whether we can attribute regular bowel movements to the regular feeding schedule (that may or may not have been maintained without the “box”).  It’s problematic, mostly because he’s turning too many knobs at once.

References

Bergen, D. (2008). Human development: Traditional and contemporary theories. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Cooper, J. O., Heron, T. E., & Heward, W. L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

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