Comparing and Contrasting Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID, Multiple Personality Disorder) with Conversion Disorder (CD)


Dissociative Identity Disorder and Conversion Disorder are similar in that they both stem from stressful events.  In Dissociative Identity Disorder a personality is formed when extreme child abuse or sexual abuse is experienced.  With Conversion Disorder it is a more recent event like a rape or physical or emotional abuse. Other than this similarity the two disorders are quite different.

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Dissociative Identity Disorder is a disorder in which the person affected suffers from as little as 2 distinct personalities and can suffer from as many as 100 or more.  Each personality has a very distinct identity, and will often take control of the person and how they act.  Because of the different identities taking over the people lose time.  They don’t remember the period of time that they were not in control and then have a hard time understanding why everything is different, especially in extreme cases when the other identity takes over for years at a time.  Usually an alternate identity takes over when the primary identity experiences something overly stressful.  It is common for people with this disorder to have other disorders or to have problems with substance abuse.  While DID has been known to last a lifetime, treatment can help.  Treatment usually involves psychotherapy and helps the person to integrate the identities into one.  It can be a painful process as well as time consuming, but according to people who have been able to achieve integration, it is definitely worth it.

Alternatively Conversion Disorder affects people in their sensory areas or physically where voluntary movement is concerned.  It is known to be a somatoform disorder and is said to be a large part of why people visit their primary care physicians.  Basically when people shove their emotions and stress too far inward they turn into physical symptoms.  This is called converting.  The conversion of these symptoms can cause a patient to contact their caregiver nine times as often.  The patient does not control the symptoms and can have a surprisingly painful beginning, and diagnosis can become complicated by a true physical illness.

Conversion Disorder has specific risk factors which include the fact that someone is female, men are less likely to receive this diagnosis.  This diagnosis is more common in the teen years, if there is someone in the family who is already receiving treatment for Conversion Disorder, it is likely to continue in the family line.

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