Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) treatment options – Examining the STAR*D Trial


When weighing the effectiveness of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) treatment options, the most logical place to start is the largest open-label pragmatic trial ever rendered; The Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial.  The STAR*D trial concluded that there were no statistically significant differences in short term remission or response rates between tested treatment options, including both CBT and pharmacological remedies, but that some treatment options had advantages over others in terms of side effects and/or mean time to remission.  (Sinyor, Schaffer, & Levitt, 2010)

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

There are many different flavors of CBTs intended to treat mood disorders.  Those flavors include those predominantly focused on learning theory or behavioral activation (BA), predominantly cognitive models such as Cognitive Therapy (CT/CBT), and models incorporating additional elements such as Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System Psychotherapy (CBASP) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MCBT).  (Meyer & Scott, 2008, p. 685)  CBT, when practiced by inexperienced STAR*D clinicians, was at least equally effective in short term follow-ups when compared with pharmacological remedies.  CBT was also associated with significantly fewer side effects.  Those facts alone should serve as reasonable justification in recommending CBT over all other treatment methods.

CBT was associated with longer times to remission when compared with pharmacological remedies, when they were effective, so if speed of improvement is of critical importance the client could potentially benefit the pharmacological treatment option.  Despite the apparent speed with which the pharmacological agents worked, choosing which drug is no easy task.  STAR*D found no clear medication “winner” for patients whose depression does not remit after one or more aggressive medication trials.  (Gaynes, Warden, Trivedi, & Wisniewski, 2009, p. 1443)  Matter of fact, every drug and combination of drugs showed the same effect as every other drug and drug combination.  (Leventhal & Antonuccio, 2009)  Some studies suggest that use of multiple antidepressant medications may double the likelihood of remission compared with use of a single medication.  (Blier, Ward, Tremblay, & Laberge, 2010)  Guess who funded that study?

There is increasing evidence that the biological explanation and pharmacological treatment of depressions is a failure.  STAR*D provides compelling evidence to that the placebo effect is the prime explanation for favorable outcomes that occur with antidepressants.  Of the patients that were found to respond positively to pharmacotherapy on the short term, the STAR*D study found that at the end of a year’s time almost all of the patients (97%) had either relapsed or dropped out.  (Leventhal & Antonuccio, 2009)  Even if we continue to leverage the pharmacological remedies, the long-range outcomes of clients with MDD are better when CBT is included, regardless of whether CBT is concurrent with or follows pharmacotherapy.  (Friedman, Wright, Jarrett, & Thase, 2006, p. 327)  The beneficial effects of CBT persist several years into post treatment and are strongly associated with preventing relapse (Kuyken, Dalgleish, & Holden, 2007), especially among individuals discontinuing medication use.  (Friedman, 2004)

As controversial as they are, “brain stimulation therapies” like electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) are effective in days, not weeks, and most have a higher response rate than any treatment tested in the STAR*D trial.  (Insel & Wang, 2009)  While ECT is still the gold standard in brain stimulation therapies, clinicians now have a growing list of FDA approved brain stimulation interventions. “These interventions include new modifications of ECT, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, implanted cortical stimulation, and others on the horizon.”  (Lisanby & Novakovic, 2009, p. 734)  Studies that utilized brain stimulation therapies to treat depression revealed significant increases in the release of norepinephrine as well as increased serotonergic activity, both of which are purported to have antidepressant effects.  (Weaver, 2009)  However, ECT is use is “limited by its invasive nature, which includes the requirement of general anesthesia and the risk of retrograde amnesia, which may be irreversible in some patients.”  (Rot, Mathew, & Charney, 2009, p. 311)  As a result, brain stimulation therapies are usually reserved for cases where depression is resistant to conventional treatments.  In addition, use of brain stimulation therapy is entirely dependent on the prescribing clinician believing in a tenuous underlying premise that norepinephrine plays a key role in depression onset and recurrence.

It would suffice to say that I favor the CBT methodology of treatment for unipolar depression, in most, if not all cases.  Personally, I would endeavor to enhance the CBT experience by utilizing cutting edge technological alternatives to traditional CBT… like virtual reality, or VR, simulations.  VR simulations are computer generated environments constructed to elicit an appropriate emotional response from clients… responses we as therapists can use in therapy.  (David, 2010)  Coupling responses that rival in vivo responses with well trained and knowledgeable CBT methods, we could usher in a new alternative to the placebo effect that passes for pharmacological intervention today.  The failure of antidepressants to provide lasting benefit, and the underlying truth that 100 years of research has failed to identify an underlying physical cause for mental disorders (including depression) leads me to believe that a “biopsychosocial model may be more useful than a disease model for conceptualizing and treating depression.”  (Leventhal & Antonuccio, 2009, p. 199)

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

References

Blier, P., Ward, H. E., Tremblay, P., & Laberge, L. (2010, Mar). Combination of antidepressant medications from treatment initiation for major depressive disorder: A double-blind randomized study. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 167(3), 281-288. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1976013231&sid=18&Fmt=4&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

David, D. (2010, Mar). Cutting edge deveopments in psychology: Virtual reality applications. Interview with two leading experts. Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies, 10(1), 115-126. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=2010171911&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Friedman, E. S., Wright, J. H., Jarrett, R. B., & Thase, M. E. (2006, May). Combining cognitive therapy and medication for mood disorders. Psychiatric Annals, 36(5), 320-329. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1069483751&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Friedman, M. A. (2004, Spring). Combined psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 11(1), 47-68. Retrieved from http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?index=40&did=526558591&SrchMode=1&sid=5&Fmt=10&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1272666830&clientId=4683

Gaynes, B. N., Warden, D., Trivedi, M. H., & Wisniewski, S. R. (2009, Nov). What did STAR*D teach us? Results from a large-scale, practical, clinical trial for patients with depression. Psychiatric Services, 60(11), 1439-1445. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1921563151&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Insel, T. R., & Wang, P. S. (2009, Nov). The STAR*D trial: Revealing the need for better treatments. Psychiatric Services, 60(11), 1466-1467. Retrieved from http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?index=28&did=1921563061&SrchMode=1&sid=6&Fmt=6&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1272667182&clientId=4683

Kuyken, W., Dalgleish, T., & Holden, E. R. (2007, Jan). Advances in cognitive-behavioural therapy for unipolar depression. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 52(1), 5-14. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1203220561&sid=5&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Leventhal, A. M., & Antonuccio, D. O. (2009). On chemical imbalances, antidepressants, and the diagnosis of depression. Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 11(3), 199-214. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1923231211&sid=19&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Lisanby, S. H., & Novakovic, V. (2009, Jun). Brain stimulation therapies for clinicians. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 166(6), 734-736. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1738370431&sid=14&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Meyer, T. D., & Scott, J. (2008, Nov). Cognitive behavioural therapy for mood disorders. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 36(6), 685-693. doi: 10.1017/S1352465808004761

Rot, M. A., Mathew, S. J., & Charney, D. S. (2009, Feb 3). Neurobiological mechanisms in major depressive disorder. Canadian Medical Association. Journal, 180(3), 305-313. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=1634710771&sid=14&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Sinyor, M., Schaffer, A., & Levitt, A. (2010, Mar). The sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression (STAR*D) trial: A review. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 55(3), 126-136. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.bellevue.edu:80/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?did=2016794701&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=4683&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Weaver, D. F. (2009, Summer). Self-induced “therapeutic seizures” for the treatment of depression. The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 21(3), 355-357. Retrieved from http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.bellevue.edu/pqdweb?index=71&did=1868802651&SrchMode=1&sid=14&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1272668233&clientId=4683

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s