Matching yourself with a therapist… important or irrelevant?


The word culture can be interpreted broadly.  It can include demographic variables such as age, gender, and place of residence; status variables such as social, educational, and economic background; formal and informal affiliations; and the ethnographic variables of nationality, ethnicity, language, and religion.  (Corey, Schneider-Corey, & Callanan, 2007, p. 115)  Given this broad based definition, it is literally impossible for us to consider every interaction as anything less than multi-cultural.  No single person is capable of sharing all the traits that contribute to our cultural identity, and as a result, any attempt to match ourselves with our clients (or clients to ourselves) is an exercise in futility.  It is impossible to match client and therapist in all areas of potential diversity, which means that all encounters with clients are diverse, at least to some degree.  (Corey et al., 2007, p. 141)  It’s a safe to assume that while you may share commonalities in one specific variable, like age for example, you likely do not share one or more demographic variables that contribute to the definition of culture.

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I would suggest we tread lightly when generalize about any single group in effort to “match” ourselves to our clients… or try to match ourselves to a potential therapist.  In doing so, we not only do injustice to our clients but we do injustice to ourselves and our own personal growth.  In my own personal journey to becoming a counselor, and indeed throughout my life, I am amazed and humbled by the differences among us.  Every time we meet someone, the potential is there to see the world through a new set of eyes.  I aspire to find as many opportunities as I can to walk in another man’s shoes, and to see through her eyes, so that I can understand more fully what it really means to be human.

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Reference

Corey, G., Schneider-Corey, M., & Callanan, P. (2007). Issues and ethics in the helping professions (8th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

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